56 Pro Death Penalty Quotes by Victims' Families whom justice was served



Relatives of victims and survivors of the Mumbai 26/11 strike today felt that justice has been done with the hanging of Pakistani terrorist Ajmal Kasab, saying it will serve as a lesson to terrorists that India is determined to act firmly against them.


Kasab was hanged to death at 7.30 a.m. at Yerawada jail in Pune after President Pranab Mukherjee rejected his mercy plea earlier this month.


Dr K Unnikrishnan, father of NSG commando K Unnikrishnan, who was killed in the Taj Hotel strike, said, “The way in which the execution has been done, it is a model way. Before anybody could react to the rejection of the mercy petition (of Kasab), everything is over. That is the thing which I cherish.”


Dr Unnikrishnan, a retired Isro official, said, “Definitely there was a long way to go for the sense of closure...Kasab's execution is only one chapter. The perpetrators are still moving around in Pakistan and the anti-India thinking in Pakistan is too much now, it should come down.”

Mrs Smita Salaskar, wife of slain encounter specialist Vijay Salaskar who fell victim to the bullets of terrorists during the carnage, said, “Though the execution was delayed, Kasab was finally hanged. With this hanging, homage has been paid to my husband.”

Thanking President Pranab Mukherjee for rejecting the mercy plea of the Pakistani gunman, Smita said, "Late Shiv Sena supremo Bal Thackeray had also demanded Kasab's hanging. His wish and our wish have been finally fulfilled."

"The entire family is happy to hear the news that Kasab was hanged, ahead of fourth anniversary of the attack," Smita said.

The hanging would surely send a message across the globe that India would not tolerate any terror attack, Smita said, adding, "I hope death sentence of Parliament House attack convict Afzal Guru would also be executed soon."

Mr Eknath Omble, brother of assistant police sub-inspector Tukaram Omble who died while capturing the terrorist, said, “I am proud and very happy that my brother's efforts have paid off.”

“We are very happy and satisfied. Ajmal Kasab should have been hanged in public, but I know our law does not permit this,” he said.

Eknath Omble, brother of police officer Tukaram Omble, who was also killed in the attacks, also welcomed the execution. “We are glad he met his end. He deserved to be hanged in public to set an example for others who intend to attack us,” he said.

Mrs Ragini Sharma, whose railway ticket collector husband S K Sharma was killed in the strike, said, “The first thing that comes to my mind is what happened is good. We are happy that we have got justice.”

Ragini Sharma, whose husband S K Sharma was killed in the 2008 terror strike, said she would like to thank the President for rejecting Kasab's mercy plea.

"I would like to thank the President. However, it got delayed but we did get justice. I am happy that it (the hanging) was done secretly, otherwide some human rights people would have opposed it," she said.

Mr Vishnu Zende, an announcer at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, the railway station here which was one of the targets of the attack, said, “I had never thought that I would get to hear this news like this."

“I am very happy that he has been hanged. All the people who died in the terror attack have been given tribute by hanging him,” Mr Zende, who had helped save many lives by making announcements over the public address system in the station about the strike, said.  

Thirteen-year-old Devika Rotwan, who was shot in the right leg in the terror attack, said, “I am very much happy that Kasab has been hanged. But I would have been happier if this would have been done in public. It is a good news that a terrorist has been hanged... Wish this should have been done on the anniversary of the attack this year.”

Devika, who studies in Class IX now, had gone to the CST with her family members and was waiting for a train, when two terrorists opened fire.

Kuresh Zorabi, whose bakery opposite Chabad House (Nariman House) in south Mumbai, was splattered with bullet holes in the 26/11 attack, said, “It is surprising and shocking, but at the same time I am little disappointed that all this was kept secret. This is difficult to digest for a second. I am thrilled that Kasab has been hanged. This will serve as a lesson to terrorists that India can take strict action against them.”

For terror attack victim Sarika Uphadyay, “It is definitely a time for celebration...it is like Diwali! We have been waiting for this since the past four years and finally it has happened. Feeling sad that this was kept as a secret.”

Sarika was at the Leopold Caf for a dinner with her friend Anamika Gupta, where Kasab and his other accomplice opened fire. “I am finding it hard to digest that he has been hanged to death. He and his accomplices had brought the city of Mumbai to a halt, killed so many innocent people...I think he should have been hanged in Mumbai and not in Pune,” she said.

Mukesh Agrawal stays well away from Mumbai's Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus train station these days. Four years ago, he was working at his newly-opened restaurant in the food plaza when he came face-to-face with death.

"It was around 9:45pm [1615 GMT] and I was about to shut shop. I was near my cash counter when all of a sudden I saw people throwing grenades. I saw a man coming towards me holding something long in his hand. After that I didn't see anything."

Mr Agrawal was shot in the stomach and lost consciousness seconds later. In a coma for 15 days, he had to have parts of his intestine removed, and fragments of shrapnel remain in his armpit.

Closed-circuit TV camera footage revealed the man who pulled the trigger on him was Qasab.

At 0730 on Wednesday morning, after months of appeals, Qasab was hanged. The news has been a cause of celebration for Mr Agrawal, coming at the start of the Hindu New Year, which began last week.

"This is the best possible New Year gift one can get. It's a beautiful thing," he said.

"They caught him red handed, yet it took them this long to do this," he says, adding that the money which was spent on keeping Qasab in jail would have been better spent on providing support and assistance to victims like him.

"He showed no mercy on anyone, so why should we show mercy on him," asks Solomon Sopher, president of the Baghdadi Jewish community in Mumbai, who agrees with the punishment.

2008 Mumbai Attacks Survivors & Victims' Families - The 2008 Mumbai attacks were eleven coordinated shooting and bombing attacks across Mumbai, India's largest city, by Islamist terrorists who were trained in and came from Pakistan. The attackers allegedly received reconnaissance (recce) assistance before the attacks. Ajmal Kasab, the only attacker who was captured alive, later confessed upon interrogation that the attacks were conducted with the support of Pakistan's ISI. The attacks, which drew widespread global condemnation, began on Wednesday, 26 November and lasted until Saturday, 29 November 2008, killing 164 people and wounding at least 308. Eight of the attacks occurred in South Mumbai: at Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, the Oberoi Trident, the Taj Mahal Palace & Tower, Leopold Cafe, Cama Hospital (a women and children's hospital), the Nariman House Jewish community centre, the Metro Cinema, and a lane behind the Times of India building and St. Xavier's College. There was also an explosion at Mazagaon, in Mumbai's port area, and in a taxi at Vile Parle. By the early morning of 28 November, all sites except for the Taj hotel had been secured by Mumbai Police and security forces. On 29 November, India's National Security Guards (NSG) conducted Operation Black Tornado to flush out the remaining attackers; it resulted in the deaths of the last remaining attackers at the Taj hotel and ending all fighting in the attacks. Ajmal Kasab disclosed that the attackers were members of Lashkar-e-Taiba, the Pakistan-based militant organisation, considered a terrorist organisation by India, Pakistan, the United States, the United Kingdom, and the United Nations, among others. The Indian government said that the attackers came from Pakistan, and their controllers were in Pakistan. On 7 January 2009, Pakistan's Information Minister Sherry Rehman officially accepted Ajmal Kasab's nationality as Pakistani. On 12 February 2009, Pakistan's Interior Minister Rehman Malik asserted that parts of the attack had been planned in Pakistan. A trial court on 6 May, 2010 sentenced Ajmal Kasab to death on all the 86 charges for which he was convicted. On his appeal against this verdict, Bombay High Court on 21 February 2011 and Supreme Court of India on 29 August 2012 upheld his death punishment. Kasab was executed by hanging at Yerwada Jail in Pune on 21 November 2012.

THE CASE: Moosa was raped and murdered on November 27, 2009, the first day of Eid al Adha. He left the family’s house in Al Qusais 3 in the morning with some friends and relatives, and al Rashidi lured him into the bathroom of a Dubai mosque, promising him an Eid gift. Once inside, he silenced the boy by covering his mouth, then raped him. He banged the boy’s head against a wall, then fled, leaving the child for dead. He was arrested soon afterwards, when his fingerprints were found to match those from the crime scene. Al Rashidi had a criminal record, which included molesting an eight-year-old boy, for which he served a prison sentence. When he killed Moosa he had been recently released from prison on separate sex assault charges. The Dubai Court of Cassation confirmed the death sentence last year, after which the death warrant had been awaiting the approval of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Vice President of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai. The last known execution in Dubai is believed to have been carried out before 1986. More than 24 convicts sentenced to die are still waiting for death warrants to be approved by the Ruler. The last execution carried out in the UAE was that of A H, a 36-year-old Emirati killed by firing squad in February 2008 in Ras al Khaimah, for murdering two men.

EXECUTION PROCEDURE: According to execution procedures, the families of convicts on death row can visit them during their imprisonment and on the day of execution, but they are not allowed to witness the execution itself. The victim’s families, however, may be allowed to witness it. Representatives from the prosecution, Dubai Police, the director of the correctional facility and a physician must be present when the sentence is carried out. The death warrant must be read aloud by the director of the correctional establishment or one of his nominees. A prosecution representative will document any last words said by the convict, and the time of death. The firing squad consists of nine men, who go to an undisclosed location. At least one is given a rifle loaded with a blank cartridge, so none of them knows who fired the fatal shot.

The family of the victim, Moosa Mukhtiar Ahmed, have been told the execution will take place today but will not be allowed to witness it, the official said.

They will be called after the sentence has been carried out and forensics experts had examined the body to confirm al Rashidi’s death. They will then be allowed to view the body, he said.

“Moosa’s mother and I want to see him die,” Moosa’s father, Mukhtiar Ahmed Khudabaksh, 32, said yesterday. “We will be relieved when we see him executed for what he did to our child.”

Mr Khudabaksh, who has worked for the Dubai Police as a tailor since last September, said: “Once I hear the gunfire, I will kneel on the ground and bow to God twice in prayer.”

“I want to see him die with my own eyes,” Moosa’s mother said, “The killer should be executed in public as a lesson to other criminals”, she said, “and the family will go early to the prison today and ask to be allowed in.”

Hooded, dressed in a black prison suit and with his arms tied behind his back, al Rashidi was driven the short distance to a nearby patch of land, normally used by police officers for shooting practice.

Though obviously terrified, witnesses say he remained quiet and did not faint, keeping to his feet as he was led to the spot where he was to be shot. There, he asked to be allowed to kneel in prayer one last time; his wish was granted before he was tied to a stake in front of the firing squad.

On Thursday 10 February 2011 at about 8.30am, with all appeal processes exhausted, al Rashidi faced a nine-man firing squad under the command of Dubai's Attorney General, Essam al Humaidan, whose duty it was to give the order to carry out the sentence of death. At least one of the men was holding a rifle loaded with a blank shot - the so-called "conscience round", designed to prevent any member of a firing squad knowing for sure that he has fired the fatal bullet.

The volley rang out at 8.35am and al Rashidi slumped forward, apparently lifeless. Moosa's father was allowed close to the body to see for himself that justice had been done and then a doctor stepped forward to confirm that al Rashidi was dead. It was 8.37am.

"Now," said Mr Ahmed, "my heart is at ease."

"My child has finally got justice. The justice he deserved," father of Mousa, the four-year-old schoolboy who was raped and murdered in a mosque on Eid Al Adha two years ago, told Gulf News.

"We are really happy and relieved that justice has been served."

Relatives of Moosa Mukhtiar Ahmed , a Pakistani who was raped and murdered by an Emirati boat captain, Rashid Rabia al-Rashidi in a Dubai mosque on 27 November 2009. The convict of murdering and sexually assaulting a four-year-old Pakistani boy in a mosque in November 2009 was executed early morning on Thursday 10 February 2011, judicial sources confirmed to Khaleej Times. Rashid Rubaih Al Rashidi, a 31-year-old Emirati fisherman was executed by a firing squad in a square in Al Ruwayyah in the presence of Eissam Issa Al Humaidan, Dubai’s Attorney General, Dubai Mufti Ahmed Al Haddad, the victim’s family and relatives. It was known that Al Rashidy recited a prayer and asked for the forgiveness of God and the victim’s parents. The Court of Cassation upheld in June last year the death penalty given by two lower courts to Al Rashidi as he was found guilty of raping and murdering Mousa Mukhtiar in the washroom of a mosque in November 2009 on the first day of Eid Al Adha. The judges threw out the defendant’s pleas of insanity and clemency, ruling no clemency would be given to the accused, who did not have mercy on the little boy. The Emirati was found guilty of enticing the boy with the promise of an Eid gift to a mosque washroom in Al Qusais. He gagged and raped the boy there and then killed him by banging his head on the floor.Earlier during the proceedings, the head of psychological medicine at Rashid Hospital, Mohammed Hassan, testified that the defendant was mentally sound, though with a pathological paedophiliac urge. The convict had a history of convictions for sodomy, rape and theft.

"Like everyone else, I also expected the Bombay high court to confirm the death sentence to Kasab. I welcome the judgement and expect that the punishment would be executed at the earliest," Vineeta Kamte said. “It was the rarest of rare case and everyone could see Kasab firing at people, killing them mercilessly, Kamte said adding, "the terrorist always deserved the toughest punishment."

Vinita, widow of late police officer Ashok Kamte, who died fighting terrorists during the 26/11 attack, on Wednesday 21 November 2012, expressed satisfaction over the hanging of Pakistani gunman Kasab saying though belated, the government had done justice to the families of the martyrs.


"Though it took a long time, justice has been done to us. The authorities maintained extreme secrecy to carry out the execution and we are satisfied," she said reacting to the news of Kasab's hanging at Yerwada jail in Pune.

Vinita Kamte is the widow of Ashok Kamte (23 February 1965 - 26 November 2008) was the Additional Commissioner of Mumbai Police for the East Region. He was killed in terrorist action during the 2008 Mumbai attacks. His bravery was honoured with the Ashoka Chakra on 26 January 2009. Ashok Kamte was killed in action by terrorists during the Mumbai attacks, on 26 November 2008 in a narrow lane between St. Xavier's College and the Rang Bhavan opposite Corporation Bank ATM just a stone away from Crime Branch office. As Mr. Kamte was known for his cool temperament and negotiation skills he was summoned when attack began. He was the Additional Commissioner of East zone, an area not under attack. When he reached CST area, he met ATS Chief Hemant Karkare and others. They took a Qualis from the Azad Maidan Police Station (AMPS), with Kamte taking taking AK47 himself. When they reached rear entrance of the Cama and Albless Hospital ( Cama ) which is next to AMPS, Kamte fired at terrorists, to which the terrorists retaliated with handgranade so Kamte suggested to take on terrorists from front entrance of Cama. By then the terrorists had left Cama sensing trouble. As the cops were moving they received wireless message that terrorists were hiding behind a red car in the same lane. At that time they spotted a terrorist running, Kamte fired, injuring him. He was Kasab lone terrorist captured alive later that night. As they were about to get down another Pakistani terrorist, Ibrahim Khan fired volley of bullets killing all but Asst. Police Inspector Arun Jadhav. Kamte was hit in the head although he was wearing helmet ( but no bulletproof jacket ) ( Times of India 19 December 2008 ) India Express quotes statements by API Arun Jadhav, who was with the officers Ashok Kamte, Vijay Salaskar and Hemant Karkare when they died. The three officers and four constables had received information that Sadanand Date had been injured in the gunfire at the Cama and Albless Hospital for women and children. Currently located at Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (CST), a ten-minute drive from the hospital, they took a Toyota Qualis and proceeded in that direction. Kamte was in the passenger seat, Salaskar driving, Karkare in the second row, and the four Constables, including Jadhav, were in the back row of seating. According to Jadhav, five minutes later two terrorists stepped out from behind a tree and opened fire with AK-47 automatic rifles. Kamte was the sole officer who managed to retaliate,wounding terrorist Ajmal in the arm. The six policemen, other than Jadhav, were all killed quickly in the gunfire. The wounded Jadhav had no opportunity to render assistance. The two terrorists approached the vehicle, dumped the bodies of the three officers on the road and, leaving the constables for dead, proceeded to Metro Junction. Upon arrival, they aimed three bursts of automatic fire at police and journalist vehicles drawn up at that location, then drove off towards the government offices (Vidhan Bhawan) in South Mumbai. Here again they fired several times. While attempting to leave the area, one of the tyres of the vehicle burst, so the terrorists departed to obtain another. At this point, Jadhav was able to contact headquarters. The bodies of the dead were promptly recovered and taken to St George Hospital. The body of Additional Police Commissioner Ashok Kamte, was cremated with State honours at the Vaikunth cremotorium on 27 November 2008. A large number of high-ranking police officers participated in the funeral procession, including: Police Commissioner Satyapal Singh, Joint Commissioner of Police Rajendra Sonawane and district collector Chandrakant Dalvi. Around 3,000 people were present.

“I am satisfied. Justice has been carried out. They have received a severe punishment for what they did.”

Tumini is a survivor of the 2002 Bali bombing in Suara Merdeka.

Sue Cooper lost her brother, Paul Hussey, in the bombings and said opponents of the death penalty should walk in her shoes for a day. “They have not suffered the pain of a loved one being murdered by a terrorist bomb,” she said. “They have no idea of the pain we suffer everyday of our lives and how we have been affected.”

Sue Copper lost her brother, Paul Hussey, in the 2002 Bali bombings.

Sydney woman Maria Kotronakis, who lost two sisters and two cousins, cried tears of relief. “We’re very happy … we’ve waited a very long time for this and this is our justice,” she said. “We lost four beautiful girls that did nothing wrong. There was nothing they ever did wrong to have been executed the way they were.”

"I've spoken to my parents, I've spoken to other members of my family and there's big relief that they're not around any more."

Maria Kotronakis lost two sisters and two cousins in the 2002 Bali Bombings.

Speaking firmly and confidently, the silver-haired pensioner read a statement in response to the judgment.

In the statement she said: "I wish to state positively and categorically that there was no miscarriage of justice, there never was any such miscarriage of justice. In the early hours of the morning of Wednesday August 23 1961 at Deadman's Hill on the A6 James Hanratty shot Michael Gregsten twice in the head at close range causing him to die instantly. "After that he raped and then shot me a number of times, pausing only once to reload his gun. From that moment I have been paralysed from just below the shoulders downwards. I was 22 years old."

Maintaining her belief in capital punishment, Miss Storie said that the fact that Hanratty was hanged meant she had been able at least to live her life without fear.

"I have always been and always will be a great supporter of capital punishment," she added.

Of Hanratty, she said: "He committed a crime, he was guilty and he must hang therefore I have got no fear of him. If he had not been hanged then his life sentence would have finished and he would be out. I don't think I would have had a moment's peace - every knock at the door I would fear he was there again."     

Valerie Storie - The woman who was raped, shot and left paralysed by A6 murderer James Hanratty has said she feels "vindicated" after his posthumous conviction appeal was thrown out. Wheelchair-bound Valerie Storie said she never had any doubts about Hanratty's guilt and backed the decision to hang him. Hanratty shot and killed Michael Gregsten before turning to his mistress, Miss Storie on the evening of August 22 1961. In February the following year Hanratty was convicted of capital murder and was one of the last men to be hanged in Britain. The Court of Appeal ruled that DNA evidence established Hanratty's guilt "beyond doubt". Lord Woolf, the Lord Chief Justice, sitting with Lord Justice Mantell and Mr Justice Leveson, announced their decision in the posthumous appeal to a packed court in London. Hanratty, 25, went to the gallows on April 4, 1962, for the notorious A6 murder in Bedfordshire, in which scientist Mr Gregsten, 36, was shot dead. His 22-year-old mistress, Miss Storie, was raped and shot. She survived but was left paralysed from the waist down.

Thursday 4 August 2011 - Mr Warner broke the family's long silence over the case after the Mercury reported this week that two Labour city councillors had backed a campaign to bring back capital punishment.

The 59-year-old, who lives in north west Leicestershire, said: "They should definitely bring back hanging.

"If they had a vote on it, I would vote yes.

"It would be a deterrent.

"I didn't know my cousin Janet because I was too young, but I do know that the family suffered.

"Her murderer deserved to die."

Mr Warner, a father-of-two who runs an engineering firm, said: "I have to be honest and say that if anyone murdered a child of mine, then I could not bear the torment of knowing he was alive in jail watching TV while my child was dead.

"I'm not comfortable admitting it, but I would want some sort of revenge. It's only human nature. I'm afraid it has to be a life for a life.

"These days, life is too cushy for criminals and there is no real deterrent.

"People have to know that if they murder someone, then they may lose their own life."

Right-wing blogger Paul Staines is behind a national campaign to bring back the death penalty, for people who kill children or police officers.

He is hoping to gather 100,000 signatures on an e-petition – a figure that, under new Government rules, will trigger a formal Commons debate and a vote in parliament.

Mr Warner said: "I read about that and I support him.

"The Government should put the vote to the people of this country but it won't.

"I reckon the majority of people would support bringing back the death penalty, and they (the Government) don't want to face that."

David Warner whose cousin, 12-year-old Janet Warner, was strangled by John Christopher Reynolds in May, 1953. Janet, of Leicester Road, Glen Hills, Blaby, was strangled on May 22, 1953, while she was out walking her dog, Rex. Reynolds, a jobless labourer from Dublin, went on the run but was caught three days later. He was in Granby Street, in the city centre, when he spotted a police officer and ran off. The police officer gave chase and caught Reynolds, and within hours he had admitted murdering Janet. Reynolds confessed to the crime and was hanged at Welford Road prison later that year.
"I am glad to see Chemical Ali hanged at last and I am psychologically relieved to see the person who killed thousands of my people being punished at last."
Aras Abdi - 43-year-old Aras Abdi, who lost 12 relatives in the Halabja attack.

The father of the two sisters, Kazuo Uehara, held a news conference after Wednesday's sentencing.

"Executing him will never bring them back," he said, but he feels Yamaji deserves to be put to death.

"In that sense, the ruling makes me feel justice still exists in Japan," he said.

Kazuo Uehara is the father of two girls murdered by triple killer Yukio Yamaji who was executed in on 28 July 2009 in Osaka, Japan.

Wednesday 21 November 2012 - The 23-year-old began that day by having drinks with friends at one of the city's most famous bars, Cafe Leopold.


"Suddenly intense firing began, so we ran to the nearby Taj Hotel. There we saw blood everywhere and people dying, so we got out, and ran to the train station to go home, only to find people being killed there too. We lay down at the station pretending to be dead on the ground. Only two in our group of nine survived."


Mr Bhamgara, who plans to celebrate Qasab's hanging with friends, says it has finally provided some closure on what happened.


He supports the use of the death penalty: "Something like this acts as a deterrent and as an example for people to know not to do things. I'm very happy with the death sentence, if one man kills another man, this works effectively to give justice," he says.

Kaizad Bhamgara was a few steps away from Ajmal Kasab on that fateful evening of the 2008 Mumbai attacks. The 2008 Mumbai attacks were eleven coordinated shooting and bombing attacks across Mumbai, India's largest city, by Islamist terrorists who were trained in and came from Pakistan. The attackers allegedly received reconnaissance (recce) assistance before the attacks. Ajmal Kasab, the only attacker who was captured alive, later confessed upon interrogation that the attacks were conducted with the support of Pakistan's ISI. The attacks, which drew widespread global condemnation, began on Wednesday, 26 November and lasted until Saturday, 29 November 2008, killing 164 people and wounding at least 308. Eight of the attacks occurred in South Mumbai: at Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, the Oberoi Trident, the Taj Mahal Palace & Tower, Leopold Cafe, Cama Hospital (a women and children's hospital), the Nariman House Jewish community centre, the Metro Cinema, and a lane behind the Times of India building and St. Xavier's College. There was also an explosion at Mazagaon, in Mumbai's port area, and in a taxi at Vile Parle. By the early morning of 28 November, all sites except for the Taj hotel had been secured by Mumbai Police and security forces. On 29 November, India's National Security Guards (NSG) conducted Operation Black Tornado to flush out the remaining attackers; it resulted in the deaths of the last remaining attackers at the Taj hotel and ending all fighting in the attacks. Ajmal Kasab disclosed that the attackers were members of Lashkar-e-Taiba, the Pakistan-based militant organisation, considered a terrorist organisation by India, Pakistan, the United States, the United Kingdom, and the United Nations, among others. The Indian government said that the attackers came from Pakistan, and their controllers were in Pakistan. On 7 January 2009, Pakistan's Information Minister Sherry Rehman officially accepted Ajmal Kasab's nationality as Pakistani. On 12 February 2009, Pakistan's Interior Minister Rehman Malik asserted that parts of the attack had been planned in Pakistan. A trial court on 6 May, 2010 sentenced Ajmal Kasab to death on all the 86 charges for which he was convicted. On his appeal against this verdict, Bombay High Court on 21 February 2011 and Supreme Court of India on 29 August 2012 upheld his death punishment. Kasab was executed by hanging at Yerwada Jail in Pune on 21 November 2012.

Freshta Raper lost 20 members of her family during the Anfal campaign.

She is among those who have welcomed the verdict.

"For the people of Kurdistan this is a day of justice," she said.

"We've waited close to 20 years now to see Chemical Ali or Ali Hassan al-Majid and his cohorts brought to justice.

"So for us really it's very important that there is a day of justice, and a day of reckoning finally for the 100s of thousands of victims of genocide."

 

Freshta Raper is an Iraq Kurd from Halabja who now lives in London.

Three men convicted of murder, rape and kidnapping sat before the judge, awaiting their fates. But first they had to face their victims' seething families.

"They broke his arms. They broke his legs. They took out his eyeballs," one woman said at the hearing Sunday in the city of Kut southeast of Baghdad, describing what the men had done to her son. "Death penalty. I want the death penalty."

A man in the back of the crowded courtroom held a sign that said: "We do not accept any sentence less than death."

Moments later, the spectators got their wish. The three alleged members of the insurgent group known as the Ansar al-Sunna Army were condemned to be hanged "in the next 10 days," according to the sentence imposed by the special criminal court.

Family members of an Iraqi raped victim In September 2005, the three murderers were the first people to be executed since the restoration of capital punishment in Iraq.

Celebratory gunfire erupted in the Shia city of Dujail moments after the verdict of Saddam Hussein was announced as residents took to the streets in defiance of the curfew, carrying photographs of loved ones they said were lost during the 1982 crackdown.

 

Abdul Zahara Hatow, 80, who bears the scars of torture from the time he was rounded up by mukhabarat officers, said, "I would like today to raise my shirt and show the whole world what the regime did to me. I feel that this sentence will be like a bandage to my wounds."

Abdul Zahara Hatow ,80, who bears the scars of torture from the time he was rounded up by mukhabarat officers.

Another Halabja resident, Kamil Mahmoud, said he still has trouble breathing as a result of the attack.

"I was afraid that I would die without seeing Chemical Ali punished for his crimes,"
said Mahmoud, who lost eight family members to the gas. "But thanks to God, the time has come for Ali to see his shameful end."

Kamil Mahmoud who lost eight family members to the gas in Halabaja.

Peter Hughes, who suffered burns to more than half his body in the Paddy’s Bar Blast, said he now had some closure. “I applaud the Indonesian Government for following it through and hopefully these radical types take it as a lesson and think about the consequences of their actions before carrying out these acts of terrorism in future,” Mr. Hughes said.

"These guys went to set about mass murder and paid the highest penalty," Mr Hughes told CNN from Perth after hearing the three men had been executed by firing squad in Indonesia.

"It doesn't feel good but they did do the crime and they've paid for it."

Mr Hughes suffered burns to more than 50 per cent of his body in the Paddy's Bar blast on October 12, 2002. He also suffered a serious leg injury and what he called "horrific" cuts to his body.

It took him two years to recover.

On Thursday 16 June 2011, Mr Hughes says while he thinks some survivors from the 2002 bombings will be relieved to see Bashir jailed, others would have preferred the death sentence.

"Look, a lot of us want this guy to be put to death, the sack. It seems to work with these guys, where if you take them off the streets, blow 'em away and that's it: you don't hear from them again," he said.

"But as it is he'll be sitting in jail, probably in a little bit of luxury. The police will look after him, the military will look after him. He'll still have access to a lot of different things that normal prisoners wouldn't get so who knows?"

Thursday 5 April 2012 - Outside the court, Mr Hughes said he hoped Umar Patek would share the fate of Amrozi and two other members of the Jemaah Islamiah terror cell responsible for the carnage - Mukhlas and Imam Samudra - who were also executed four years ago.

“I know one thing's for sure, we haven't heard from the three that got the death penalty,” he said.

“So, I think we just add one more to the list.”

Thursday 21 June 2012 - Mr Hughes said Patek should have shared the same fate as three other members of the Jemaah Islamiah terror cell responsible for the carnage - Amrozi, Mukhlas and Imam Samudra - who were executed four years ago.

"Really, this guy should get the death penalty before anybody. To keep him alive, well, there's no reason to keep him alive. To get 20 years, after killing 202 people and injuring many hundreds, it's not much." 

Peter Hughes suffered burns to more than half his body in the Paddy’s Bar Blast in the 2002 Bali Bombings

Former North Melbourne and Carlton football hard nut Mick Martyn, who was injured in the 2002 Bali Bombings blasts, said he hoped the executions would be a strong deterrent to other people considering violent acts. “If people think they can do this and get away with it, the precedent has been set that if you are involved, these are the consequences,” he said. “It’s sending a message out that if you do acts of terrorism that’s what you will be faced with.”

Michael Martyn (born 31 August 1968) is a former professional AFL Footballer who played for the North Melbourne Kangaroos and the Carlton Football Club . He is the son of Bryan Martyn who also played for North Melbourne and is a relative of early Carlton champion Paddy O'Brien. He is an AFL life member.

Perth-based football manager Simon Quayle, who lost seven teammates in the blast, said although the executions had been a long time coming, it was important that the sentences were carried out as ordered.

"In regard to the shooting and their deaths, it's fantastic that justice is being served and that's pretty much what I am feeling," he said.

"I think it's a reflection of good police work on the part of the Indonesians and the fact that justice is being carried out."

Although six years had passed since the bombing, the emotional and physical scars remained.

"I don't have any anger or need for revenge but . . . I can imagine that it'll be a really important occasion for parents who've lost their children and people who've lost close relatives, who think about them every day," Mr Quayle said.

"Those people will be very, very happy and celebrating hard.”

"I'm more about the signs of justice. If justice would've (meant) a sentence of life imprisonment and it was carried out, I would've been satisfied. But I still think terrorists should get the death penalty."

Simon Quayle - Perth-based football manager Simon Quayle, who lost seven teammates in the 2002 Bali Bombings.

“I want him to be executed here in the place where he committed the worst crime for the sake of the victims.”

A Kurdish man referring to the death sentence of Chemical Ali on 24 June 2007.

"Again! Kill him again!" people shouted as Mohammad Bijeh's body swayed above the main square of the town of Pakdasht.

"This is the strength of the Islamic tradition. This is true justice," said Mouhammad Nouri.

"This is the happiest day in my life. Apart from the day my late son was born," a father of another boy victim whispered as he watched, mesmerised, Mohammad Bijeh's bulky figure appear on an improvised stage in the square.

Families of the victims of Mohammad Bijeh Mohammed Bijeh (Persian: محمد بيجه) (February 7, 1975 – March 16, 2005) was an Iranian serial killer. He confessed in court to raping and killing 16 young boys between March and September 2004, and was sentenced to 100 lashes followed by execution. All the boys were between 8 and 15 years old. In addition, he killed two adults. On March 16, 2005, in Pakdasht, Iran, the town near the desert area where the killings occurred, in front of a crowd of about 5,000, Bijeh's shirt was removed and he was handcuffed to an iron post, where he received his lashings from different judicial officials. He fell to the ground more than once during the punishment, but did not cry out. A relative of one of the victims managed to get past security and stab Bijeh. The mother of one of the victims put a blue nylon rope around his neck, and he was hoisted about 10 meters in the air by a crane until he died.