103 Pro Death Penalty Quotes by Victims' Families whom justice was served in the U.S.A (2005 to 2009)



Summary:
Simpson and his pregnant, sixteen-year-old girlfriend, Stephanie Eury, went for a walk to look for some money. Stephanie went to the front door of 92 year old Reverend Jean Darter's house and rang the doorbell. She told Reverend Darter she was hungry, and the Reverand invited them in and gave them milk and a soft drink, sponge cake and peaches. The next day, Simpson and Eury decided they would go back to Darter's house after dark to get money. They rang the doorbell, and when Reverend Darter answered the door, they forced their way inside. Simpson told Eury to cut the telephone cords, then forced Reverend Darter back to the bedroom, demanding money. When he said he had no money, Simpson choked him on the bed. When the Reverend said that if he was killed, he knew he was going to heaven, Simpson grabbed a belt, put it around his neck, then looped the other end around the bedpost and tightened it, all the while demanding money. Simpson called for Eury to come and hold the belt while he went in the kitchen to look for a weapon. He returned with an ampty pop bottle, and beat the Reverend with it. He then went into the bathroom and got a double-edged razor blade, slicing the Reverend's arms from the biceps all of the way down the under side of the forearms to the wrist. Eury gathered a bag of food, a porcelain lamp, a radio, and boxes of Kleenex. Upon arrest, Simpson made a complete confession, and at trial pled guilty to first degree murder. The jury returned a death sentence three times after the first two sentences were reversed on appeal. Eury was sentenced to life imprisonment. Curtis Faircloth, a grandson of Darter's, who also watched the execution, said it was very peaceful, orderly and humane. "And it should be that way," he added.

Curtis Faircloth, a grandson of Darter's, who also watched the execution, said it was very peaceful, orderly and humane. "And it should be that way," he added.

Darter, a Baptist preacher, would have supported Simpson's sentence, Faircloth said. "Punishment in the Bible is severe and complete," he said. "In a Biblical context, what happened last night is appropriate."

Curtis Faircloth is the grandson of Jean Ernest Darter who was murdered by Perrie Dyon Simpson on 27 August 1984. He was executed by lethal injection in North Carolina on 20 January 2006.

More than 11 years ago, Erick Martinez awoke to his mother's cries and tried to defend her from an attack by a knife-wielding intruder at their San Antonio home. On Wednesday night, he watched as the man who also stabbed him was put to death. "It wasn't difficult," he said after witnessing the execution of 38-year-old Luis Salazar. "I was kind of looking forward to it."

Erick Martinez whose mother was stabbed to death by Luis Cervantes Salazar on 11 October 1997. He was executed by lethal injection in Texas on 11 March 2009. In October of 1997, Martha Sanchez lived at 250 Future Street in San Antonio with her husband Oscar Ochoa, ten-year-old stepson Erick, two-year old daughter Brianna, and four-month old son Timothy. For approximately three years, Luis Salazar lived next door to Martha Sanchez and her family and was well-acquainted with them. In fact, Ochoa had helped Salazar obtain employment at the Super K-Mart where Ochoa himself worked. The family’s encounters with Salazar, however, were not always positive. Ochoa testified that earlier in 1997 Salazar approached Martha in her home and asked if he could borrow some sugar, but “not that kind of sugar.” Ochoa confronted Salazar and ordered him to stay away from the family’s home. According to Ochoa’s testimony, Martha thereafter became afraid of Salazar. Martha’s 19-year-old niece Nicole also testified that she had served as a babysitter at the family’s home and spent the night there on numerous occasions. On several of those occasions, she explained, Salazar would call late in the evening asking for Martha’s company. According to Nicole, however, Martha refused to speak with Salazar. Salazar moved out of his house around September of 1997 and took up residence at 122 Ashland in San Antonio. Sanchez last spoke to Ochoa in the early morning hours of October 11, 1997. As was his custom when working the “graveyard” shift, Ochoa called home from work at about 12:30 a.m. Evidence indicated that, at some time after that phone call, Salazar entered Martha’s home through the left front window, using an empty milk crate to climb into the home. A trail of muddy footprints led from the window inside the house. Salazar retrieved a knife from the kitchen and entered Martha’s bedroom. As Salazar began stabbing Martha, a struggle ensued, leaving the bedroom in disarray. Stepson Erick testified that he awoke to Martha’s scream: “Luis, why are you doing this? Leave me alone!” Erick then entered the bedroom where he saw his stepmother struggle while Salazar was stabbing her. As Erick attempted to grab the knife, Salazar stabbed him in the chest. Martha instructed Erick to leave and call for help, and he did so, ultimately finding his way to the home of a woman named Sylvia, who lived nearby. Sylvia testified that she answered her door to find Erick bleeding from his chest and begging frantically for help. He told her that someone had broken into the home and stabbed both him and his stepmother. Erick identified Salazar as the attacker. Sylvia called 911 and sent her future son-in-law Adrian to the Sanchez home to investigate. Adrian removed the two youngest children, Brianna and Timothy, safely from the home. He testified that he then entered the home again and, after checking Martha’s pulse, realized that she was dead. An EMS unit soon arrived, confirmed Martha’s death and transported Erick to University Hospital. Salazar had fled the scene. Later, however, Salazar telephoned 911 to turn himself into police, who arrested him without incident and informed him of his Miranda rights. Meanwhile, police approached Ochoa at work and informed him of his wife’s death. Physical evidence showed that Martha had suffered stab wounds to the heart, lungs, and aorta, causing her death. Moreover, the medical examiner testified that Martha’s death was not immediate; it took several minutes for her to die. In addition, Martha suffered contusions and skin abrasions on the outer thigh, as well as contusions to the inner thigh. According to the medical examiner, although Martha suffered no genital injuries, no sperm was present, and her clothes had not been removed, this pattern of bruises and scratches indicated an attempted sexual assault. Evidence at the scene also indicated that the telephone lines outside the home had been cut and that the interior of the home was in shambles, although no fingerprints were found on the front windows. Investigators found a cordless phone under Martha’s left arm and the bloody kitchen knife on a coffee table near Martha’s bedroom. Salazar testified at trial. Although he did not deny that his actions caused Martha’s death, he offered his own version of the incident. He claimed that, on the evening of October 11, he and his brother went to a friend’s home in San Antonio, where they smoked marijuana and snorted cocaine, and they drank beer and liquor. He left the home between 3:00 a.m. and 4:00 a.m., went to a local taco bar but was unable to find a ride home. He thus decided to go to his old home on Future Street, which his mother-in-law still owned and at which he still kept some personal belongings. Salazar testified that although he intended to go to the home at 254 Future, he mistakenly approached Sanchez’s home at 250 Future. And because he no longer had his key to the home at 254 Future, he decided to enter through the window. Once inside, he claimed (believing that he was in his own home) that he heard a frightening noise. Salazar then obtained a knife from the kitchen. He testified that he walked out of the kitchen, bumped into a person he could not see, became frightened, and began stabbing the unknown person. Salazar further stated that, during his stabbing frenzy, he felt a pain in his arm, realized that someone was behind him, and he began stabbing that person, as well. He then saw the person behind him and heard the victim say “Run!” or “run Erick!” According to Salazar, he subsequently realized that he was in the wrong home and simply left the house. Salazar testified that his state of mind during the incident was similar to a black-out. He stated that he did not remember Martha screaming “Luis, why are you doing this to me?” he did not remember Brianna crying and he did not remember Erick telling him to leave Martha alone. He also denied cutting the telephone lines at 250 Future and denied trying to rape Martha, although he offered no explanation for the bruises and abrasions on her legs. At trial, Salazar admitted stabbing Martha Sanchez to death after entering her house without consent. He further testified that he found her attractive, he desired to have intercourse with her, and he had recently propositioned her. Salazar also admitted that he told his wife before the murder that violence made him feel good and that he had dreams about killing people. The prosecution also presented evidence that Martha Sanchez was afraid of Salazar and that Salazar had committed a prior sexual assault on an acquaintance, although he pleaded guilty to a lesser charge. There was evidence that the telephone lines had been cut before Salazar went into the house. Salazar’s muddy footprints led directly from the point of entry to the kitchen where he obtained two knives, which were the murder weapons. He then went to Martha Sanchez’s bedroom. The only signs of struggle were in Martha Sanchez’s bedroom and her blood was found only in her bedroom. Martha Sanchez’s body was found on the floor of her bedroom on top of some of her bedding. There was no reason for Salazar to be in Martha Sanchez’s house, other than his claim that he entered by mistake. The medical examiner testified that the bruise pattern on Martha Sanchez’s legs was consistent with a person wrapping his hands around her knees and legs in a forcible attempt to separate her legs. The medical examiner concluded, based on her experience with known rape victims, that the bruise pattern indicated an attempted sexual assault. She gave specific testimony regarding the age, size and placement of the bruises and abrasions on Martha Sanchez’s body and explained why those factors supported her conclusion. She also testified that the bruise pattern on Martha Sanchez’s legs, the mud on Martha Sanchez’s inner thigh, and the fingernail abrasions on her thighs was inconsistent with Salazar’s version of events. The medical examiner gave specific, cogent reasons for her conclusion that the bruise pattern indicated an attempted sexual assault. She pointed to ten different contusions and a “scratch abrasion” which formed this pattern. She placed particular importance on four contusions on the inside of her knee and thigh. The defense called no witnesses other than Salazar and rested after Salazar’s testimony. Salazar was charged with a single count of capital murder committed during the course of committing or attempting to commit aggravated sexual assault and burglary. At trial, Salazar’s intent to commit a sexual assault on the night of the murder was an important issue. Among other evidence, the prosecution elicited testimony from the medical examiner that the pattern of contusions on the victim’s body indicated an attempted sexual assault contemporaneous with her death. The medical examiner’s opinion about the pattern of contusions on Martha Sanchez’s body was not expressed in the autopsy report, and defense counsel attempted unsuccessfully to keep this testimony from the jury. Defense counsel also attempted to discredit the medical examiner’s opinion on cross-examination, but he did not consult with an independent pathologist or call any rebuttal witnesses to refute the medical examiner’s testimony. Although a number of lesser-included offenses were included in the jury charge, Salazar was convicted of capital murder as charged in the indictment and sentenced to death. He appealed directly to the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, which affirmed the conviction and death sentence in an unpublished opinion. UPDATE: A man who crawled through the window of a San Antonio home and fatally stabbed a mother of 3 has been executed tonight in Huntsville. Luis Salazar thanked his friends and relatives for their friendship and fellowship and expressed love to his mother, brothers, sister and his children. Salazar never acknowledged the family of 1997 Martha Sanchez or her slaying in an attack police say happened after he'd been on a drugs and drinking binge. Sanchez's oldest child, Erick, -- who was 10 at the time of the killing and tried to stop the slaying -- was among the witnesses. In his final statement, Salazar referred to his own family, saying: "I'm going to miss them and take them with me in my heart. Thanks to everyone praying for me." He said: "My heart is going ba-bump, ba-bump, ba-bump." Salazar then laughed. He asked for forgiveness and recited the Lord's Prayer. Salazar was asking for forgiveness for what he called the "sins that I can remember" when the drugs began taking effect. Salazar testified at his trial that after a night of marijuana, cocaine and drinking he thought he was in his own house just before dawn Oct. 11, 1997, and that Martha Sanchez, 28, and her three children were intruders. Evidence, however, showed the telephone wires at the home next door to where Salazar previously lived had been cut and Sanchez's injuries indicated Salazar had tried to rape her before she was fatally stabbed. He denied cutting the phone lines or the attempted rape. The woman's 2-year-old daughter was asleep in the same bed and a 6-month-old son was in a crib nearby. Sanchez's screams woke her older son, 10-year-old Erick, who was asleep in an adjacent room and he went into his mother's room to see what was going on. Then he tried to defend his mother from the knife-wielding intruder he knew as the man who used to live next door and was stabbed in the chest as his mother yelled at him to run outside and get help. Leaving a trail of blood, the boy pounded on the doors of homes until he found a neighbor to respond. Salazar had attacked his mother and him, he told the neighbor. Almost a year later, the boy showed a Bexar County jury the scars from his wound as he testified at Salazar's capital murder trial. A neighbor testified how she changed the clothes of the 2-year-old who had her mother's blood all over her. Almost four years before the attack, Salazar had pleaded guilty and received two years probation for misdemeanor assault for a sexual attack on an 18-year-old mentally disabled high school student. And some four years before that, he was given probation for four counts of aggravated robbery for holding up convenience stores. Richard Langlois, one of Salazar's trial lawyers, said the previous convictions were difficult to overcome in the minds of jurors who had been asked to spare Salazar's life because he's endured an abusive childhood. "It was a situation where he had a prior sexual assault," Langlois said. "I think our defense was that he got in the wrong house, that he lived a couple doors away." But he said when evidence showed the phone wires to Sanchez's home had been cut, "That kind of blew that." "He had a violent history," said Bert Richardson, the former Bexar County assistant district attorney who prosecuted Salazar. Testimony also showed that when he'd lived nearby, he made sexual passes at Sanchez, whose husband had helped Salazar get a job at a Kmart. Sanchez's husband was at work the night of the slaying. A neighbor who answered Erick's cries for help saw a man riding a bicycle fleeing from the house. Salazar called police later that day and said he wanted to surrender. "I think the whole town was looking for him at that point," Richardson said. "The guy was on probation for three or four aggravated robberies and had raped a mentally retarded girl. But even if you throw that aside, (this case) was gut-wrenching because of the kids. They were all there." Erick's wounds were superficial and he recovered. The emotional and psychological scars were more lasting, Richardson said. "It kind of tore his life apart," Richardson said. "He's had a few bumps in the road." UPDATE: A 17-year-old cold case murder was solved with the confession of a killer just moments from the death chamber. Luis Cervantes Salazar was executed in March 2009 for the stabbing murder of a woman in October 1992. But shortly before his death, he was encouraged by his spiritual counselor to speak with Texas Rangers about other crimes he committed. He confessed to the 1992 stabbing of a young female clerk at the Stop and Go at Woodlawn and 36th Street in San Antonio, just an hour and a half before he was executed. San Antonio police say his confession solved the murder of Melissa Morales. Salazar had not previously been considered a suspect. After Salazar's death, Texas Rangers contacted SAPD cold case detectives with the information. After learning of the details of the Capital Murder, it was clear that the victim was Melissa Morales, a store clerk who had been stabbed thirteen times while working at the Stop n Go at 2409 NW 36th Street on April 19, 1992, Easter Sunday. Once the audio taped interview was received and transcribed, SAPD Detectives went about verifying Salazar's confession. Salazar gave details about the Capital Murder that could have only been known by the murderer. These details confirmed that Salazar had murdered Melissa Morales during a robbery. On Thursday April 2nd, 2009 SAPD detectives notified Melissa Morales' parents, Stephen and Alma DeLeon, and her grandparents, Jesse and Carolina Robledo of Salazar's confession. After Melissa Morales' murder, her parents, grandparents, and Carrie Willborn lobbied Legislature with State Representative Leticia Van de Putte to require all convenience stores to install security cameras. Because of their efforts the bill was passed.

Summary: McNair and another man went to the home of Ella Foy Riley, an elderly widow who lived alone and occasionally hired McNair to do yard work. When Ella came to the door, McNair asked her if he could borrow twenty dollars. Riley told him she had no money to lend him. McNair then asked if he could have a glass of water. Ella invited him in, and when she turned around McNair grabbed her by the neck and stabbed her in the throat. When the blade of the knife broke off in Ella’s neck, McNair’s companion retrieved another knife from the kitchen and McNair stabbed Ella in the neck again, then strangled her for several minutes as she bled to death. When an officer came to his house the next morning, McNair admitted killing Ella and later directed officers to the place where he had dumped the purse. McNair was originally convicted and sentenced to death. On direct appeal, the sentence was vacated and a new hearing ordered. The second jury recommended a sentence of life without parole by a vote of 8-4. The court rejected this recommendation and again sentenced McNair to death. McNair's accomplice, Olin Grimsley, received a life sentence for first-degree robbery for his role in the attack.

Pat Jones and her brothers Calvin, Don, John, Bobby and Wayne Riley wore buttons with their mother's photograph for the execution. The buttons said "You are not forgotten." Wayne Riley, the youngest of the sons, issued a statement afterward: "I thank God for keeping myself, my four brothers and my sister alive and in good health so that we were able to see justice finally done. I ask that you pray for my family in the coming days and for the Willie McNair family, too, for they ... have suffered for what he has done."

Wayne Riley also said: "I can forgive Willie McNair for what he did because he paid the price with his life." Later the six children gathered with other family members for a candle light vigil. Participating was District Attorney Doug Valeska, who prosecuted McNair.

Family members of Ella Foy Riley who was stabbed to death by Willie McNair on 21 May 1990. He was executed by lethal injection in Alabama on 14 May 2009. Summary: McNair and another man went to the home of Ella Foy Riley, an elderly widow who lived alone and occasionally hired McNair to do yard work. When Ella came to the door, McNair asked her if he could borrow twenty dollars. Riley told him she had no money to lend him. McNair then asked if he could have a glass of water. Ella invited him in, and when she turned around McNair grabbed her by the neck and stabbed her in the throat. When the blade of the knife broke off in Ella’s neck, McNair’s companion retrieved another knife from the kitchen and McNair stabbed Ella in the neck again, then strangled her for several minutes as she bled to death. When an officer came to his house the next morning, McNair admitted killing Ella and later directed officers to the place where he had dumped the purse. McNair was originally convicted and sentenced to death. On direct appeal, the sentence was vacated and a new hearing ordered. The second jury recommended a sentence of life without parole by a vote of 8-4. The court rejected this recommendation and again sentenced McNair to death. McNair's accomplice, Olin Grimsley, received a life sentence for first-degree robbery for his role in the attack.

Summary: 22-year-old Tami Engstrom met Biros at the Nickelodeon Lounge in Masbury, Ohio. She had gone there to socialize with her uncle and became so intoxicated she passed out in her chair. As the bar was closing, her uncle took her keys from her and Biros volunteered to take Tami for coffee to help sober her up. Biros and Tami left the Nickelodeon in Biros's car and her uncle remained at the bar after closing and waited for Biros to return with Tami. However, neither Biros nor Tami ever returned. When Tami did not come home that night, the police were called. Biros told the police and Tami's family that she had "freaked out" in his car, and she jumped out and ran through yards and he could not catch her. He later told police that he touched her leg and she fell out and hit her head on the railroad tracks. After consulting with counsel, Biros showed police the location of Tami's body, which had been dismembered, eviscerated, and buried in two different counties in Pennsylvania. Tami's head and right breast had been severed from her torso. Her right leg had been amputated just above the knee. The body was completely naked except for what appeared to be remnants of black leg stockings that had been purposely rolled down to the victim's feet or ankles. The torso had been cut open and the abdominal cavity was partially eviscerated. The anus, rectum, and all but a small portion of her sexual organs had been removed from the body and were never recovered by police. The cause of death was strangulation. At trial, Biros denied admitting to the murder, and testified that Tami had jumped out and fled from the vehicle. He followed and inadvertently struck her. Biros denied having had any sexual intentions toward Tami, but admitted cutting out her vagina and rectum thirty to forty-five minutes after he killed her. The medical examiner testified that there were 91 separate cutting or slashing wounds on the recovered body.

"This is my happy day that I was here to see this execution," said Mary Jane Heiss, the victim's mother. She watched Biros die from her wheelchair while hooked up to an oxygen tank because of lung disease.

"I'm just glad the state of Ohio came up with the procedure," said Tom Heiss, the dead woman's brother. "I have no thoughts for him. I'm glad he's gone. It brought some closure to our family." The Heiss family applauded briefly after Biros' death was announced.

Family members of Tami L. Engstrom who was murdered by Kenneth Biros on 8 February 1991. He was executed by lethal injection in Ohio on 8 December 2009. Summary: 22-year-old Tami Engstrom met Biros at the Nickelodeon Lounge in Masbury, Ohio. She had gone there to socialize with her uncle and became so intoxicated she passed out in her chair. As the bar was closing, her uncle took her keys from her and Biros volunteered to take Tami for coffee to help sober her up. Biros and Tami left the Nickelodeon in Biros's car and her uncle remained at the bar after closing and waited for Biros to return with Tami. However, neither Biros nor Tami ever returned. When Tami did not come home that night, the police were called. Biros told the police and Tami's family that she had "freaked out" in his car, and she jumped out and ran through yards and he could not catch her. He later told police that he touched her leg and she fell out and hit her head on the railroad tracks. After consulting with counsel, Biros showed police the location of Tami's body, which had been dismembered, eviscerated, and buried in two different counties in Pennsylvania. Tami's head and right breast had been severed from her torso. Her right leg had been amputated just above the knee. The body was completely naked except for what appeared to be remnants of black leg stockings that had been purposely rolled down to the victim's feet or ankles. The torso had been cut open and the abdominal cavity was partially eviscerated. The anus, rectum, and all but a small portion of her sexual organs had been removed from the body and were never recovered by police. The cause of death was strangulation. At trial, Biros denied admitting to the murder, and testified that Tami had jumped out and fled from the vehicle. He followed and inadvertently struck her. Biros denied having had any sexual intentions toward Tami, but admitted cutting out her vagina and rectum thirty to forty-five minutes after he killed her. The medical examiner testified that there were 91 separate cutting or slashing wounds on the recovered body.

Linda's mother, Dora Azrak, said Friday night she was relieved that Williams had finally been executed. But it was a tough day for her while she waited on word at her Florida home. "It just brings back all these memories." She's looking for closure now. "I'm just hoping I will get better," she said. Since the murders she's been depressed. And it was hard knowing that for two years after the murders Williams was free.”

Dora Azrak is the mother of Linda Williams who was murdered by Luke A. Williams III on 19 June 1991. He was executed by lethal injection in South Carolina on 20 February 2009.

Patricia Pendergrass, sister of victim Bryon Schletewitz, told ABC News: "His mind is still very clear. His mind is just the way it was when he was 50 years old and planned this heinous crime.

"He knows exactly why he will be taken into that execution chamber."

"It will close a chapter for me," said Schletewitz's sister, Patricia Pendergrass, who is the last surviving member of her family.

Patricia Pendergrass is the sister of Bryon Schletewitz who was murdered by Clarence Ray Allen (January 16, 1930 – January 17, 2006) was an American murderer who was executed by lethal injection on January 17, 2006 at San Quentin State Prison in California for the murders of three people. At age 76, he became the second oldest inmate to be executed in the United States since 1976. (John B. Nixon of Mississippi was executed in December 2005 at age 77). He remains (as of May 2010) the last inmate executed in California. Pro-death penalty activists cite Allen's actions as a reason to support capital punishment in the United States. He was already serving a life sentence for one murder when he was convicted of organizing the killing of three more people.

Summary:
Mary Bounds, age 56, was reported missing on November 29, 1987. A few days later her vehicle was located in Houston, Mississippi. Inspection of the vehicle revealed spattered blood around the driver’s side door. Her body was found nearby. She had been severely beaten. It was later determined that she died of head injuries from repeated blows. Earl Wesley Berry’s confession provided the details of what transpired. On the evening of November 29, 1987, while driving through Houston in his grandmother’s vehicle, Berry saw Mary Bounds near a church. As she was preparing to enter her vehicle, he approached and forced her into his vehicle, ultimately driving to a wooded area out of town. Mary pleaded with Berry, but he beat her with his fists and forearm. Afterwards, he carried her further into the woods and left her. Berry's brother called the police after he witnessed suspicious behavior. Berry was arrested at his grandmother’s home and soon confessed to the crime. Police found the mismatched tennis shoes Berry had discarded in a pond, along with bloodied towel.

 

Following the execution, Bounds' husband, Charles Bounds, spoke to reporters. "I don't have much to say. I just think it took too long," he said. "I have had this on my mind for 20 years, and it really takes a lot out of me." Bounds then spoke harshly to Mississippi Department of Corrections Commission Chris Epps, though Epps was not the one who halted the execution. Tonight, they hugged. "Justice has just now been brought to bear against the man who admitted killing (Mary Bounds)," Epps said.

 

Bounds' daughter, Jena Watson, also spoke, saying her mother would have wanted people to forgive Berry. "Tonight, we feel that we have received justice for what was done," she said.

Family members of Mary Bounds - She was beaten to death by Earl Wesley Berry on 29 November 1987. He was executed by lethal injection in Mississippi on 21 May 2008.

The victim's mother, Dottie Poage, also witnessed the execution. She described her son as someone who wanted friends, and made a bad choice in befriending Elijah Page.

"He stepped out of those boundaries, and considered someone a friend who took his life and he paid the ultimate price," said Poage. "Elijah Page had the ultimate penalty for his ultimate crime. And for that I am proud of the state, the attorney general, the governor, everyone at the penitentiary for a job well done. I am proud to be an American."

Dottie Poage of Rapid City, whose son, Chester, was murdered in March 2000 after being beaten and tortured by three men in Higgins Gulch west of Spearfish, answered that this way: "Can you put a price on your child's life?"

"Can you put a price on your own life?" Poage said, with emphasis. "To me, it's worth every damn cent."

In her own way, Dottie Poage said she "respects" one of the men who tortured and killed her son in a Spearfish canyon 11 years ago.

It's an appreciation engendered by Elijah Page's decision to halt his appeals and accept in July 2007 the lethal cocktail that legally ended his life.

"I found out that Page, who didn't tell me but told someone else, was truly sorry for what he did," Poage, 56, said from her Rapid City home.

"He said he can't take it back, but that he took full responsibility for what he did. To him, being executed meant accepting his punishment and following through with it so he could come to grips with himself for committing the crime. And I do respect that."    

Monday (15 October 2012) night's execution of Eric Robert was the first since Elijah Page was put to death by lethal injection in July 2007. Page was sentenced for his role in the brutal killing of Chester Allan Poage.


"You know, my son's life was cut way too short.  He was never able to marry and have children, to give me grandchildren.  That's something that I can only vision in my mind.  What if?" Dottie Poage said.


It's that question that lies at the heart of the pain and loss still felt by Dottie Poage.


In 2007, Poage witnessed the execution of Elijah Page, one of two men sentenced to die for the brutal 2000 murder of her 19-year-old son.


"It does bring somewhat of closure, some sort of calm, but it still does not bring your loved one back," Poage said.

Poage says that her heart goes out to Lynette Johnson, the wife of murdered Correctional Officer Ron 'R.J.' Johnson.


"I can very much identify with her as she probably can with me, knowing that one step has been done and it prepares you for the second step and the final time," Poage said.


Just as Rodney Berget is still awaiting his execution in the murder of officer Johnson, Briley Piper is also on death row for his role in the killing of Poage's son.


"You have to wait.  You have to wait for the process to be done accordingly," Poage said.

But more than 12 years after the murder of her son, Poage says she still has faith in the system and the death penalty.


"It does not bring your loved one back but it helps to strengthen why we have this system to help us, to help make us a little bit stronger, to give us a little more hope for other people," Poage said.


Briley Piper is in the process of appealing his death sentence.  However, Poage says she's confident that the sentence will ultimately be carried out and plans on being there to witness the execution.

Dottie Poage is the mother of Chester Allen Poage, who was murdered by Elijah Page and two men on 12 March 2000. Elijah Page was executed in South Dakota on 11 July 2007.

Dzong Tu, a Vietnam-born graduate student in economics at Cornell University in New York, is believed to have been Ross' first murder victim. Her death followed a string of rapes on campus in the spring of 1981. Ross also was a student at the university. "We will always miss my sister," said Lan Tu, Dzong's brother, "and I feel that this was only (a) small measure of justice for the pain that Michael Ross caused our family and the loss, but it is an ending."

 

Lan Tu brother of Dzung Ngoc Tu who was the 1st victim of serial killer, Michael Bruce Ross on 12 May 1981. He was executed by the state of Connecticut on 13 May 2005.

 

Cheryll Witz, who's father, Jerry Taylor, was fatally shot on a Tucson, Ariz., golf course in March 2002, said she was unhappy that Muhammad didn't say anything before he died. But she said his execution begins a new chapter in her life. "I've waited seven long years for this," she said. "My life is totally beginning now. I have all my closure, and my justice and my peace."

 

"When Muhammad was put to death, I thought justice was served," Cheryll Shaw said at a family home.  Her father, Jerry Taylor, was killed by D.C. snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo on a Tucson golf course.

 

"The first thing that went across my head when the execution started was just reliving everything of how my dad was killed," she said.

"But then you think, 'this is another life being taken,' but then when you sit back and realize that this was my father he took place in killing, I believe he got what he deserved," Shaw said.

Cheryl Shaw whose father, Jerry Taylor was shot dead by John Allen Muhammad in March 2002. He was executed by the state of Virginia on 10 November 2009

Nelson Rivera, whose wife, Lori Ann Lewis-Rivera, was gunned down as she vacuumed her van at a Maryland gas station, said that when he watched Muhammad's chest moving for the last time, he was glad. "I feel better. I think I can breathe better," he said. "I'm glad he's gone because he's not going to hurt anyone else."

 

Nelson Rivera whose wife was shot dead by John Allen Muhammad, she was his 7th victim. He was executed by the state of Virginia on 10 November 2009.

Edwin Shelley, whose daughter Leslie Shelley was killed by Ross along with her best friend in 1984, said the convicted killer got what he deserved. "We have waited 21 years for justice, and I would like to thank the jury in Bridgeport, the jury in New London, and finally the state of Connecticut for finally giving us the justice that our children are due."

 

For two decades, Lera Shelley endured what seemed like endless court hearings as she waited for the execution of her daughter's murderer, serial killer Michael Ross.

It was all worth it, Shelley said, the moment she saw Ross die by lethal injection in the death chamber at Osborn Correctional Institution in May 2005.

Finally, she said, there was justice for 14-year-old Leslie and the seven other women whom Ross admitted killing in the early 1980s.

"When I saw Michael Ross take his last breath, I knew it was all over. No more appeals, no more 'Walking with Michael' on the Internet," Shelley said Wednesday 3 April 2012. Before his death, Ross' prison writings were posted on a Web page in a newsletter titled, "Walking with Michael."

But with the state's death penalty near repeal, Shelley said that other family members of murder victims might not get the chance to get the justice and closure she said she found in execution, a finality she said she needed to move on in life.

"It was like a big cloud that had been hanging over our head for years had finally been lifted and sunshine was coming in," said Shelley, 68, of Griswold.

Family member of Leslie Shelley who was the 7th victim of serial killer, Michael Bruce Ross on 22 April 1984. He was executed by the state of Connecticut on 13 May 2005.

Summary: Two months after he had been paroled from prison, Michael Richard approached Marguerite Dixon’s son, Albert, in front of the Dixon home in Hockley and asked if a yellow van parked outside the home was for sale. Albert said the vehicle belonged to his brother who was out of town and suggested that Richard come back another time. Richard left. When Albert and his sister, Paula, left a few minutes later, Richard returned and entered the house. He took two television sets and put them in the yellow van, sexually assaulted Mrs. Dixon and shot her in the head with a .25 caliber automatic pistol. Richard admitted he was involved in Mrs. Dixon’s murder and offered to help find the murder weapon. Police found the weapon and testing revealed it to be the gun that fired the fatal shot.

"It means in this particular case, the system worked, it was thorough," Stephen Dixon, whose mother was killed in the attack, said after watching Richard die. "The person executed deserved what he got." Dixon said he wasn't too concerned with the delays. "I was told to expect such things," he said. "It's been a long 21 years."

Stephen Dixon whose mother was murdered by Michael Wayne Richard on 18 August 1986. He was executed by lethal injection in Texas on 25 September 2007. Summary: Two months after he had been paroled from prison, Michael Richard approached Marguerite Dixon’s son, Albert, in front of the Dixon home in Hockley and asked if a yellow van parked outside the home was for sale. Albert said the vehicle belonged to his brother who was out of town and suggested that Richard come back another time. Richard left. When Albert and his sister, Paula, left a few minutes later, Richard returned and entered the house. He took two television sets and put them in the yellow van, sexually assaulted Mrs. Dixon and shot her in the head with a .25 caliber automatic pistol. Richard admitted he was involved in Mrs. Dixon’s murder and offered to help find the murder weapon. Police found the weapon and testing revealed it to be the gun that fired the fatal shot.

Haney's brother, Talladega Police Lt. Billy Haney, was among the victim's family members who witnessed the execution. "I'm there for the family and to see justice carried out as what was sentenced in the lower courts," the officer said in an interview. "I don't want people to think I'm in it for revenge. Dad used to say he'd never live to see the man executed. He died at 80 in 2000," said another brother, Daniel Haney, who also was present at the execution. He said the murder had tortured the family. The victim had seven sisters and three brothers.

 

Brothers of Jerry Haney who was shot dead by Jerry Paul Henderson on 1 January 1984. Jerry Paul Henderson was executed by lethal injection in Alabama on 2 June 2005.

Summary: Julie Heath's vehicle was discovered abandoned on Highway 270, west of Malvern. A week later, her body was found on rural property approximately 7.5 miles from her vehicle. Although the autopsy failed to reveal the cause or manner of death, medical evidence showed likely trauma to the head, and defects to her clothing were consistent with a cutting wound. At trial, Nance's brother and sister testified that, after initially denying any involvement in the crime, Nance later stated that he had accidentally killed the victim. Nance told them that Heath's automobile had broken down on the road, that he picked her up, that his work knife slid out of his pocket, that as he moved to put the knife in the glove compartment, the victim turned started kicking him, that he put his hand up to keep her from kicking and hitting him, and that the knife fatally lodged in her throat. The jury didn't buy this account.

 

"This is not easy for any of us and we do feel for his mother, his family," said Johnie Hood, a cousin of the victim. "I just pray that Julie rests in peace now. He couldn't say he was sorry. What he went through tonight was painless compared to what he put Julie through." Hood and other family members watched the execution via closed-circuit television in a prison office. Heath's mother Nancy killed herself a year after her daughter's murder.

 

"It brings closure that he is gone, but it will never bring back Julie - what he's done to our family, I hope that he did say he's sorry to someone for what he had done," said Belinda Crites, another cousin. "We want to make sure the devil dies. He's gone now so I hope they can rest in peace."

 

 

 

Family members of Julie Heath - Eric Randall Nance (January 1, 1960 – November 28, 2005) was an American man who was convicted of the murder of Julie Heath on 11 October 1993 in the state of Arkansas. While on death row, the former heating and air conditioning technician obtained his high school equivalency certificate and penned multiple poems, one of which was set to music and recorded by the Celtic Tenors. Nance was executed in 2005, twelve years following the crime.

“It won’t bring my brother back,” said Sulema Balverde, 34, Garza’s older sister. “But it will bring him justice.”

“I want to watch him breathe his last breath,” Irene Garza said of the man convicted of killing her 22-year-old son, Carlos Garza, whose body was found nine years ago in a pool of blood, two gunshots to his head.

Irene Garza, 54, said she understands the pain Blanton’s mom must feel.

“It wasn’t her fault her son did what he did,” she said. “She’s going to miss her son the way I miss my son. But we didn’t cause these problems. My son was a good boy.”

Several of Garza’s relatives attended the execution, including his mother Irene Garza, wife Yvonne Garza and sisters, Sulema Balverde and Irene Escobar. “I miss my son dearly and have waited for this day to finally get here,” Irene Garza said in a released statement. “This will be closure for me.” Yvonne Garza called Blanton’s execution one that provided both justice and closure for herself and the couple’s son. “I know it won’t bring him back,” she said. “We can finally move on with our lives.”

Family members of Carlos Garza who was murdered by Reginald Winthrop Blanton on 13 April 2000. Reginald Winthrop Blanton was executed by the State of Texas on 27 October 2009.

Summary:
Stanley Hall and Rance Burton drove to a St. Louis shopping center looking for a vehicle to steal to use in a drive by shooting. They approached Barbara Jo Wood as she pulled into the parking lot and forced her at gunpoint to the passenger side and then drove her in her car to the McKinley Bridge. Wood was forced out of the car, and eventually thrown off the bridge to the icy river 75 feet below. Witnesses in a passing car saw the struggle and notified police. Burton got back in Wood’s car and drove away. The police arrived and captured Hall moments after he pushed Wood off the bridge. The body of Barbara Jo Wood was recovered from the river 7 months later. Following his arrest, Hall admitted forcing Wood over the guardrail. At the time, Hall was on parole for wounding a 4-year-old girl while he was chasing and shooting at a man in St. Louis in 1987.

 

Mark Velcheck of Florissant, one of Wood's brothers, said earlier Tuesday he was relieved that the sentence would be carried out. "I'm glad for Barbara that this person will pay the price," said Velcheck, a witness. "You hate to say you want somebody to die, but this guy deserves it."

 


Mark Velcheck of Florissant is the brother of Barbara Jo Wood. She was murdered by Stanley L. Hall on 15 January 1994. Stanley was executed by lethal injection in Missouri on 16 March 2005.

Summary:
Moody conspired with his girlfriend, Wanda Robbins, to kill her husband so the pair could split a $5,000 insurance policy. On Sept. 16, 1994, Moody pretended to be interested in purchasing a car owned by Donnie Robbins and shot him in the back of the head. At 5:30 a.m. on the day after the murder, Wanda Robbins called the life insurance company seeking payment. Wanda Robbins was sentenced to life in prison plus 65 years after she pleaded guilty to second-degree murder, conspiracy to commit murder and insurance fraud. This was not the first time that Moody had plotted with a woman to kill somebody. He spent five years in a Florida prison for a similar scheme that failed. Moody interrupted his murder trial in 1995 to plead guilty to the slaying of Robbins.

 

The victim's sister, Peggy Robbins Smith, planned to watch Moody's death by lethal injection at Raleigh's Central Prison so she could keep a promise to her brother, Donnie Robbins. "I made my brother a promise when I was with him at the casket," said Smith, 47, of Thomasville. "I promised him that I would see justice done. I feel like this will be a way to fulfill my promise."

 

 

 

Peggy Robbins Smith is the sister of Donnie Ray Robbins who was murdered by Patrick Lane Moody on 16 September 1994. He was executed by lethal injection in North Carolina on 17 March 2006.

Summary:
Known as the Gainesville Ripper, Rolling murdered four University of Florida students and a Santa Fe Community College student in their apartments in 1990. He decapitated one victim, posed with some of the bodies, removed skin and body parts and arranged the murder scenes using props that included broken mirrors. The macabre slayings began on August 24, 1990 when Rolling broke into the apartment of 17-year-old university freshmen Sonja Larson and Christina Powell. They were found mutilated and stabbed to death. He had raped both women, one after she was dead. The next day, Rolling killed Hoyt, 18. Her body was found propped up, sitting on her bed bent over at the waist. Rolling had sliced off her nipples and left them on the bed next to her, and police discovered that her torso was sliced open, from her chest to her pubic bone. Her severed head perched on a shelf across the room. Two days later, Rolling killed roommates Tracy Paules and Manuel Taboada, both 23. Rolling remained at large until September 8, when he was arrested after a botched robbery in the central Florida town of Ocala. He was later linked by DNA to three more killings in Shreveport, Louisiana, in 1989. He was not charged in the Gainesville slayings until 1992, while serving a life sentence for armed robbery and other crimes. He pleaded guilty to all five murders as the jury was being selected for trial in 1994.

 

Ricky Paules, the mother at whom Rolling had glanced, said she had one reaction: ``Hatred. Very, very bitter throughout the whole thing. I saw his breath go out of him. . . . We waited for this time. And justice was done.'' With Rolling's death, she said, she could remember only her daughter, Tracy Paules.

Ricky Paules is the mother of Tracy Paules who was murdered by serial killer, Danny Rolling on 27 August 1990. Daniel Harold Rolling (May 26, 1954 – October 25, 2006), also known as The Gainesville Ripper, was an American serial killer who murdered five students in Gainesville, Florida. Rolling later confessed to raping several of his victims, committing an additional 1989 triple homicide in Shreveport, Louisiana, and attempting to murder his father in May 1990. In total, Rolling confessed to killing eight people. He was executed by lethal injection in 2006.

Summary:
Following his conviction for Burglary, Ferguson served time in a drug treatment program and received a 2-day pass on December 21, 2001. His murder spree began four days later on Christmas Day in Dayton when he attacked and killed a disabled relative, 61 year old Thomas King, with a kitchen knife. Ferguson stole two televisions and a radio that he sold to buy crack cocaine. The next day, Ferguson broke into the home of an elderly couple who were his former neighbors, attacked them with a kitchen knife, then beat and stomped them to death. Ferguson waived his right to a jury, pled guilty to all charges, and waived his right to presentation of any mitigating evidence. A court-appointed clinical psychologist then conducted an evaluation of the defendant and deemed him competent to stand trial.

"Killer's final words will be directed to his family; Prison officials don't expect repeat of vile outburst given by Satanist during trial for killing three people," by Tom Beyerlein. (August 8, 2006)

LUCASVILLE — Condemned triple murderer Darrell Wayne "Gator" Ferguson of Dayton said if he gives a final statement on the execution table this morning, it will be directed at his family, a prison spokeswoman said Monday. That may mean Ferguson, a Satanist, isn't planning a repeat of the hateful diatribe he issued against his victims at his 2003 sentencing. Regardless of what he says, prison policy doesn't allow the warden to pull the microphone plug. "We can't restrict the content or duration of his statement," spokeswoman Andrea Dean said. "We can't interfere with his freedom of speech."

Eight people, including the sons of Ferguson's disabled and elderly victims, are to watch him die by lethal injection at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility. Ferguson's mother, Donna Davis; stepfather, Paul Yates; and natural father, Clarence Vela Sr., also are scheduled to be witnesses.

Late Monday, Ferguson, 28, gobbled a "special meal" of three T-bone steaks cooked medium rare, two breaded chicken breasts with a side of ranch dressing, chocolate ice cream and Mountain Dew. He enjoyed a contact visit with relatives, listened to radio and chatted with his executioners about life in Dayton.

Ferguson's family will donate his body to Wright State University for biological study, Dean said. Ohio Gov. Bob Taft declined to grant clemency Monday. The only thing that could stop the execution is if Ferguson changes his mind and decides to exercise his appeals, Dean said.

Ferguson pleaded guilty and asked for the death penalty in the Christmastime 2001 stabbings of Arlie and Mae Fugate and Thomas King Sr. in East Dayton. A drug addict, Ferguson was on Christmas leave from a halfway house and used robbery proceeds to buy intoxicants.

Immediately after the execution, a family friend of one of the victims, Chris Purdue, said, "Goodnight. I hope he stays in hell forever." Ferguson, a long-time drug user and high-school wrestler — he now weighs 285 pounds — taunted his victims' families at the sentencing phase of his trial two years ago when he said he took satisfaction and pleasure in killing their loved ones. “I will never show any remorse, even on the day I die.” He didn't.

Chris Purdue is a family friend of one of the victims of Darrell Wayne Ferguson’s victims. Darrell Wayne "Gator" Ferguson (January 30, 1978 – August 8, 2006) was a convicted murderer executed by the state of Ohio. At the age of 28, he was the youngest inmate put to death in Ohio since 1962. He spent 2 years and 10 months on death row and had waived all appeals after his 2003 conviction for three counts of aggravated murder.

Summary: 17 year old Alicia was kidnapped on the way to a store two blocks from her home in Terre Haute by Benefiel, who was armed with a gun and wearing a mask. Alicia was tied-up and gagged, driven to Benefiel’s home and taken inside. During 4 months of captivity inside Benefiel’s home, Alicia was raped and sodomized over 60 times at gunpoint. Most of this time she was chained and handcuffed to a bed. He glued her eyelids shut, put tape over her eyes, and toilet paper in her mouth. She was cut with a knife and beaten. After 3½ months, Alicia saw a second girl, Delores Wells, in the home. She was naked and handcuffed on the bed, with tape over her eyes and mouth. She later saw Benefiel beat Delores and put superglue in her nose, then pinch it together. Benefiel left the home for 2 hours and upon his return, confessed to Alicia that he had killed and buried Delores. When police knocked on the door, Benefiel stuffed Alicia into a ceiling crawl space. The police entered with a search warrant and rescued her. The body of Delores was found soon after in a wooded area. An autopsy revealed injuries to her vagina and anus, and established asphyxia as the cause of death. (insanity defense)

 

Margaret Hagan felt relief when she received word early Thursday that the man who killed her daughter 18 years ago had been put to death. "I never thought the day would come, and when it did, it went fast," she said. "I'm going to try to put him as far behind me as I can."

 

 

 

Margaret Hagan is the mother of Delores Wells who was murdered by Bill J. Benefiel on 7 February 1987. Bill J. Benefiel was executed by lethal injection in Indiana on 21 April 2005.

Summary:
Carr, his girl friend Melissa Burgeson, and 17-year-old Keith Patrick Young attended a party on the evening of the crimes, where they all consumed alcohol and used drugs. Carr and Burgeson discussed robbing the victim at the party. In the early hours of the following day, Burgeson took the victim's car keys and talked him into letting her drive him home. Burgeson drove the victim, Carr, and two juveniles to a remote area of south Monroe County in the victim's car. During the ride, Carr showed one of the juveniles a large knife and whispered that he intended to kill the victim. Burgeson stopped the car on a dirt road, and when the victim opened the trunk to look for more drugs, Burgeson motioned to Carr to kill him. Carr grabbed the victim's hair, pulled his head back and slashed his throat. At Burgeson's urging, Carr stabbed the victim repeatedly and then beat him in the head with a baseball bat. After Burgeson took the victim's money, Carr and one of the juveniles dragged the victim's body to the roadside, leaving him to die from his injuries. Carr and Burgeson fled to Tennessee in the victim's car and were arrested following a high speed chase. After receiving medical treatment at a local hospital, they were placed in the back of a police car in which police had activated a hidden tape recorder. Their recorded conversation, in which Carr admitted killing the victim, was introduced into evidence at Carr's trial. The jury was also authorized to find from the evidence that the knife used to stab the victim was discovered in Burgeson's purse. Burgeson was convicted and sentenced to a life sentence with the possibility of parole.

 

Young's mother and grandfather witnessed Carr's execution. "It's finally over for our family," said Young's mother, Deniese Cail. "He's gone and he did not go where my son is. My son is in heaven."

 

 

Deniese Cail mother of Keith Patrick Young who was murdered by Timothy Don Carr on 8 October 1992. Carr was executed by lethal injection in Georgia on 25 January 2005.

Summary: Luis Ramirez was convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death for the murder of his ex-wife’s boyfriend, Nemecio Nandin. Nemecio Nandin was a fireman and part-time washer/dryer repairman who was dating Ramirez’s ex-wife. Ramirez had been jealous of any of his ex-wife’s boyfriends, and Ramirez’s daughter testified that Ramirez was visibly upset about his ex-wife’s relationship with Nandin. Days before Nandin’s murder, Ramirez was seen meeting with an associate, Edward Bell, at a house where Bell and his girlfriend had previously lived. At around the same time, Bell told the man at whose home he was then staying that Ramirez had hired him to kill a fireman for $1,000. Nandin was killed at the house where Bell formerly lived on April 8, 1998, shot twice in the head with a shotgun and buried on the property. His truck was later discovered at a local Wal-Mart. Bell’s girlfriend testified that she left Bell alone, without a car, at the murder scene house between 11 A.M. and noon on the day of the murder, and that Ramirez dropped Bell off at the girlfriend's aunt’s house between 3:30 and 4 P.M. that afternoon. As she drove Bell back from her aunt’s house back to the murder scene later that afternoon, she saw Bell throw two latex gloves out of the car window. Police later recovered the gloves and a set of keys fitting Nandin’s truck. A subsequent search of Bell's girlfriend’s car revealed Bell’s wallet, containing two of Ramirez’s business cards and handwritten notes including directions to Ramirez's ex-wife's house, her address, her uncle’s address, and descriptions of her and her uncle’s cars. Police also discovered in the car a pair of jeans and a glove spattered with Nandin’s blood. Shortly after the murder, but before his arrest, Bell described the murder to the man he was staying with. Bell told the man that he and Ramirez had gone to the house where the murder occurred, called Nandin for a washer repair, handcuffed Nandin when he arrived and shot him with a shotgun, burying him on the property. Testimony indicated that Ramirez had purchased the same brand of handcuffs years earlier. The state also introduced evidence suggesting a plausible timeline, a period of time in which Ramirez could have been with Bell at the murder scene, committing the murder. Ramirez’s girlfriend testified that on the day of the murder Ramirez had packed a bag and left his home between 12:30 and 1:00 P.M. and returned around 3:00 or 3:30 P.M. Finally, the state introduced evidence that Ramirez and Bell were seen together after the murder and that on at least one occasion Bell, who had no apparent means of support, returned from such a meeting with cash. UPDATE: Texas carried out the 15th execution of the year just after 6 p.m. Thursday as convicted killer Luis Ramirez was given a lethal injection for his role in the 1998 shooting death of a San Angelo firefighter who had dated Ramirez’s ex-wife. Ramirez was sentenced to die for initiating the murder-for-hire plot that led to the death of firefighter Nemecio Nandin, 29. An accomplice, Edward Bell, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. Prosecutors described Ramirez as a jealous ex-husband so obsessed with his former wife that he paid $1,000 for help in a plot leading to Nandin's death. The 42-year-old inmate denied any involvement in the 1998 shotgun slaying. The firefighter's body was found in a shallow grave in a rural area about 25 miles northeast of San Angelo. The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles rejected a defense request Wednesday to commute the inmate's sentence to life. The board also rejected a request for a 120-day reprieve. Ramirez also lost an appeal to the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, prompting his lawyers to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, which refused to act to block the execution late Thursday afternoon.

 

"We just wanted to know justice would be done," Able Nandin, the victim's brother, said after watching the execution. "Justice was done." Addressing his slain brother by name, he added, "We miss you and we love you."

 

 

Able Nandin is the brother of Nemecio Nandin who was murdered by Luis Ramirez on 8 April 1998. Luis Ramirez was executed by lethal injection in Texas on 20 October 2005.

“I can sleep a little more better,” Latisha Clark, Patrick Clark’s twin sister, said after watching Moore die. “Knowing that he’s not going to be on the street, I can feel more comfortable,” her sister, Peggy, added. “Justice has been served.”

Family members of Patrick Clark who was murdered by Frank Moore on 21 January 1994. He was executed by lethal injection on 21 January 2009 in the State of Texas.

“This is the final step to closing everything,” Yost’s widow, Angie Houser-Yost, said. “They have caused a lot of pain for a lot of people, not only for my family and his family but for the people who walked in and found Richard, their visions, what they will live with now.”

Angie Houser-Yost is the widow of Richard Yost who was murdered by Darwin Demond Brown on 26 February 1995. He was executed by lethal injection in the State of Oklahoma on 22 January 2009.

John Allen Muhammad was a cold-blooded murderer.  He never gave any sort of apology to any of the families of the victims he murdered.  He stole so many precious lives from the families and friends who loved them.  He deserves the punishment he was given.  "Our loved ones will never come back."  I believe justice has been served.

I would like to thank everyone who worked so hard on this case.  I'm so proud that the United States government has laws set in place to protect its citizens from people like Muhammad and Malvo.  These men thought they were above the law and could get away with the horrible things they did.  The American law enforcement community has proved them wrong, and for that I am very grateful.  Thank you.  Muhammad's death has brought me and my family a measure of peace.  I wish that Malvo could face the same punishment.

Kwang Im Szuska whose sister, Hong Im Ballanger, was murdered on 23 September 2002 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana by the D.C Sniper, John Allen Muhammad. John Allen Muhammad was executed by lethal injection in Virginia on 10 November 2009.  

Vaughan said, "I think justice has been done . . . he got what the 12 jurors said he should get."